1. 09:48 16th Apr 2014

    Notes: 66732

    Reblogged from epicukulelesolo

    Tags: body languagereference

    forficwritersbyficwriters:

    amandaonwriting:

    Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language

    We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.

    by Amanda Patterson

    You guys, this is such a great chart especially for budding writers. Sometimes it’s more effective to show a character being bored or excited or shocked without explicitly saying so.

     
  2. 08:02 15th Apr 2014

    Notes: 1563

    Reblogged from writeworld

    Tags: novel cardsgood ideas

    Writing Tip: Novel Cards

    almosthappiness:

    Hello, All,

    If you have a trouble with your many bubbling ideas, I have a technique which may help you keep all of your thoughts organized and recorded. 

    When you have an idea you would like to use in your work, but you don’t know where or when it can fit in, write it down! You are a writer and made to write, and I can’t stress enough how important it is to keep all of those newly blossoming concepts together in a neat pile. 

    How I handle my ideas are with notecards, which I call “Novel Cards.” You can have as many as you want for whatever topic. Here are some examples:

    • Chapter Cards - they tell the main plot happenings for any chapter you come up with. These cards are solid. You know when they will happen and what will happen.
    • Moment Cards - these cards are for scenes or ideas that you know will happen, but when it will is not clear yet. These cards are fluid, they are open to change and some are more detailed than others.
    • Character Cards - these cards cover characters who will be introduced or who you do not know well yet. They might not even have a name!
    • Dialogue Cards - these cards capture all of the witty or dramatic discourse between characters that may have an unclear space in the story but you definitely want to include.

    You can create these cards for any topic, from a person to a thing to a planet. The more platforms you play with your story through the clearer it will become, but don’t forget that the best way to “learn” your story is just by writing it! 

    image

     
  3. 08:02 12th Apr 2014

    Notes: 99582

    Reblogged from chiefandguide

    Tags: referenceblood twblood loss

    adventuresintimeandspace:

    Here are some scientific facts about blood loss for all you psychopaths writers out there.

     
  4. 08:02 11th Apr 2014

    Notes: 1248

    Reblogged from writeworld

    Tags: referencesuitsfight scenes

    Realistic Writing

    slitheringink:

    Fighting in Suits

    Doing research to add realism to your writing is incredibly important, so I figured I’d start a post series concerning the various questions I’ve had, and the answers I’ve come across regarding this subject.

    I have a lot of fight scenes in my novel and I have a character who wears a suit all of the time. Anyone who has ever worn a suit knows they don’t allow for a great range of movement and I’m surprised that James Bond hasn’t torn more of them considering how many fights he gets into. But as we all know, Hollywood tends to lie and I was curious if fighting in a suit was even possible.

    In my search I stumbled across this wonderful article: http://www.vulture.com/2012/11/bespoke-tailor-explains-james-bonds-suits.html

    It’s an interview with a professional tailor and he tells exactly what he would do to a suit in order to make it viable to wear in a fight:

    How would you tailor a suit or tuxedo to make it fighting-ready?

    Armholes would be high. That’s the key thing — armholes have to be high. The shoulders have to be natural, so as little shoulder pad as possible. Small armhole, but the sleeve has to be a little bit fuller, so you’re able to just raise your arms up. Also, it has to be the correct width for the arm. It shouldn’t be too wide or too close. There’s no general rule on how it should be – it depends on the customer’s arm.

    And what about if someone needed to be able to kick. What alterations would need to be made?

    Oh, they would definitely have to be comfortable wearing their trousers really high. Because if you’re wearing a low-cut trouser, then you’d have to wear a fuller cut in order to have that comfort. But if you want to wear a nice, skinny trouser, a slim-fitting trouser, then you have to be comfortable wearing your crotch high. Pretty much, the key for that kind of movement is the crotch. Like, the jacket would be the armhole, for the trouser it would be the crotch.

    How would a suit need to be cut for the wearer to be comfortable carrying a handgun?

    I’ve done a suit for someone who carries a small .22 – legally that is [laughs]. The thing is a fuller chest. So right under the ribcage, exactly that position where the weapon would be concealed, that would be fuller. And then everything else would be tapered down.   

    There seems to be a lot of very specific alterations needed. Would it be possible for James Bond to do his thing if the suit wasn’t specifically made for him?

    No, no. It’s not possible. There’s no fixed amount of how deep or how wide the armhole should be. It all depends on that customer. How your arms are when you’re standing relaxed is incredibly important: Are they forward, are they slouching to the side, are they a little back as if your chest is pushing up? The balance of the sleeve has to be just in the right place and Bond wouldn’t get the accuracy necessary without it being costumed.  

    So yes fellow writers, it is indeed possible to realistically fight in a suit when your character is wearing one that’s specially tailored. Be sure to check out the full article for more great information!

    -Morgan

     
  5. 16:03 10th Apr 2014

    Notes: 336

    Reblogged from writingquotes

    Tags: quoteswriting

    Basically, fiction is people. You can’t write fiction about ideas.
    — Theodore Sturgeon
     
  6. 08:02

    Notes: 338

    Reblogged from a-writers-littlethings

    Tags: writingquote

    image: Download

     
  7. 16:03 9th Apr 2014

    Notes: 435

    Reblogged from a-writers-littlethings

    Tags: truehandwriting

    Quick Tip

    imustalwayswrite:

    Writing longhand (aka on a notebook with a pen) will increase your output.  You will find that there are no little red lines that appear under misspelled words or green ones that show up below “grammatical errors”. It lets the writing just flow out of you, just the way it should.

     
  8. Writer’s block…a lot of howling nonsense would be avoided if, in every sentence containing the word WRITER, that word was taken out and the word PLUMBER substituted; and the result examined for the sense it makes. Do plumbers get plumber’s block? What would you think of a plumber who used that as an excuse not to do any work that day?

    The fact is that writing is hard work, and sometimes you don’t want to do it, and you can’t think of what to write next, and you’re fed up with the whole damn business. Do you think plumbers don’t feel like that about their work from time to time? Of course there will be days when the stuff is not flowing freely. What you do then is MAKE IT UP. I like the reply of the composer Shostakovich to a student who complained that he couldn’t find a theme for his second movement. “Never mind the theme! Just write the movement!” he said.

    Writer’s block is a condition that affects amateurs and people who aren’t serious about writing. So is the opposite, namely inspiration, which amateurs are also very fond of. Putting it another way: a professional writer is someone who writes just as well when they’re not inspired as when they are.

    — Philip Pullman (via the-hardyest-critic)
     
  9. Anonymous asked: Can you give me tips on writing about electrocution?

    klariza-helps:

    Note: I had to sit through a 45 minute electrocution lecture courtesy of a teacher I asked about the history of electrocution. See how I love you?

    Anyway, sure thing! I was going to just give you a paragraph on writing it, but then one thing led to another, and I decided to go ahead and write a small guide on electrocution and electric shock, as I couldn’t find a tumblr based one myself. (If all you really care about is writing it, just scroll down to the end of the post.)

    Let’s start out with what electrocution is and basic information about it.

    Know the difference between electrocution and electric shock. (I’m bringing this up because people often confuse electrocution and electric shock.) The basic difference is that one kills you, and the other doesn’t.

    • Electrocution - “death caused by electric shock, either accidental or deliberate. The word is derived from “electro” and “execution”, but it is also used for accidental death.”
    • Electric shock - “a sudden discharge of electricity through a part of the body.” (non-deadly)

    Current is what kills in electrocution. The current level is determined by the applied voltage and the resistance of the material (i.e., your body) that the current is flowing through. Depending on the individual, the resistance of dry skin is usually between 1,000 -100,000 W.

    image

    image

    (image courtesy of my digital electronics teacher)

    POTENTIAL TRIGGER WARNING?: If you’re interested, take a look at this post. It shows a dead body after electrocution

    Most electrocutions are done accidentally. It’s actually rather rare that you are electrocuted on purpose. In fact, electrocution in general isn’t all that commonplace. One count that I found expressed electrocution with a lifetime odd of 1-in-5,000 for Americans. (I’m almost sure that the website was referring to a high current electric shock, but I’ll let it slide.) I don’t know what sort of situation your character is in, but keep this in mind when writing.

    • Electric Shocks

    An electric shock is usually painful. A small shock from static electricity may contain thousands of volts but has very little current behind it due to high internal resistance.

    Their danger levels depend on:

    • The amount of current flowing through the body.
    • The path of the current through the body.
    • The length of time the body is in the circuit.
    • The voltage.
    • The presence of moisture.
    • The phase of the heart cycle when the electric shock occurs.
    • The health of the person before the occurance.

    Shock effects include:

    • Psychological
    • Burns
    • Neurological

    Fun fact: electric shocks are used in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). General anesthesia and a muscle relaxant ensured that the patient doesn’t feel a thing, even though enough electricity to light a room for one second passes through their brain. Patients do, however, experience (typically) temporary memory loss. ECT is known to be used on severely depressed patients or patients with boipolar disorder. (x) 

    • Electric Chair:

    Alright, so I’ll start off with some early history on the electric chair, because who doesn’t love background information?

    New York built the first electric chair in 1888 (figures). (William Kemmler was the first to be executed in 1890.) Others began to adopt this method, though it is not the sole method of execution in any state today as it was then. (The electric chair remained the only method in Nebraska until February of 2008.)

    image

    (1890, used to kill Kemmler)

    image

    (2005)

    What happens in the process, you ask?

    Well, the person is usually shaved and strapped to a chair with belts. The belts cross the prisoner’s chest, groin, arms, and legs. A metal electrode is attached to the scalp and forehead, over a sponge that has been moistened with saline (it can’t be too wet or too dry). An additional electrode is moistened with Electro-Crème and attached to a part of the prisoner’s leg. The prisoner is blindfolded, and the execution team leaves the room. The warden tells the executioner when to pull the handle to connect the power supply. A current jolt of 500 to 2000 volts for about 30 seconds is given, but this varies from case to case. (Robert Gleason Jr. received 1,800 volts at 7.5 amps at TWO 90-second cycles.) The body relaxes when the current is turned off. The doctors wait momentarily, and then go check to see if the heart is still beating; if it is, another jolt of electricity is given, and this continues until the doctors can officially proclaim that the heart is not beating. (Multiple physicians check this.)

    Give me gross specifics on what goes on, maybe?

    The prisoner’s hands usually grip the chair. They may violently move their limbs, causing dislocation or fractures. Their tissues swell. Defecation occurs. Steam/smoke rises, and the smell of burning is in the air. At postmortem, the body is hot enough to blister if it is touched. An autopsy has to be delayed so that the internal organs can cool. Third degree burns with blackening are present where the electrodes met the scalp and legs.

    Quotes! I want quotes on what happened, I command you to give me quotes!

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice William Brennan had this to say about execution by electric chair: “…the prisoner’s eyeballs sometimes pop out and rest on [his] cheeks. The prisoner often defecates, urinates, and vomits blood and drool. The body turns bright red as its temperature rises, and the prisoner’s flesh swells and his skin stretches to the point of breaking. Sometimes the prisoner catches fire….Witnesses hear a loud and sustained sound like bacon frying, and the sickly sweet smell of burning flesh permeates the chamber.

    I wanted to talk a bit about botched executions as well. 

    • William Vandiver- He was still breathing after an initial surge of 2,300 volts. The execution took a total of 17 minutes and five jolts of electricity.
    • Wilbert Lee Evans - When hit with the first jolt, blood spewed from the right side of the mask on his face, covering his shirt with blood and a sizzling sound could be heard as blood dripped from his lips. Evans moaned continuously until a second jolt of electricity was applied. 
    • Pedro Medina - Foot-high flames shot from the headpiece during the execution. The execution chamber was filled with a stench of thick smoke. It gagged the two dozen official witnesses. An official flipped a switch to cut off the power to end (early) the two-minute cycle of 2,000 volts. Medina’s chest continued to heave until he died after the flames went out.

    Gruesome? Definitely.

    • How do you apply all of this in your writing?

    Take the information I have given you in stride. Understand what electrocution and electric shock are. Know your character. Some people are scared of death, some aren’t. Know how your character would react in such a situation when they’re face to face with the person who, with the pull of a switch, will send a lethal amount of current running through their body. 

    On an ending note, I highly recommend you READ THIS ESSAY. Not only does it send goosebumps down my arm every time I read it, it will help you understand the psychological aspect of electrocution as well. 

     
  10. thewritingcafe:

For all you writers out there who want to create a language for your story.
When creating a new language, it’s important to think of these four things:
Is it a spoken language?
Is it a written language?
Is it a sign language?
Is it a combination of the above?
Once you’ve decided how your language exists, you can move on to the next steps:
What culture does it belong to? Try reflecting the culture within the language. The Dothraki in A Song of Ice and Fire center their language around horses as spoken of in this article. Think of the sound and what emotions it could be compared to.
How old is it? Decide how old your language is and its history. Language changes over time and borrows from other languages as it grows.
Is it a dead language? A dead language is a language that is no longer used in ever day life. If there is a dead language (like Latin) in your culture, what records exist of it? Several cultures use the Latin name for species all over the world and English speakers use Latin phrases all the time. Does anyone study this language? Does anyone know how to pronounce it? Are there any missing pieces?
Who uses it? Decide who uses this language. If it is spoken and there is more than one language used in the area, is there only a certain group of people who speak this language? If it is written, what is the literacy rate?
Once you’ve established the above, you’ll have down the basics of your language. Now we’ll move on to specific types of language:
Spoken Language:
Alphabet: Again, really think of how you want it to sound. Create a phonetic alphabet for the spoken language and build the vocabulary off that. 
Vocab: If the language is used sparingly in your story, start with the phrases you use first. Create words for these. See how they sound together. Keep track of these words and their various forms (past, present, plural, singular, etc.).
Grammar: Play with the sentence structure. In Latin, a verb is often at the end of the sentence. In Spanish, the adjective comes after the noun most of the time. Keep these structures consistent and don’t make it too confusing if you have trouble with this.
Translate: Translate everything you have into the language you write in, even if you don’t use it. Write as much detail as you can about your languages to make it as authentic as possible.
Style: What would be considered the “formal” style? If there is a written language, is the formal style used more often in writing than in speaking?
Accents: Does the pronunciation of words differ from place to place? It most likely will if the language is widespread. Accents are influenced by other cultures and languages. The accents of the southwestern US came from English accents while other southern accents came from the influence of France and Jamaica.
Stress: Know what syllables to stress. This will affect the pronunciation and overall sound of your language. 
Written Language:

Alphabet: Create the written alphabet. There are a few ways you can do this. One is making new letters for each letter you have in the alphabet you write in and another is creating letters that stand for phonetic sounds. The shapes of the letters should be consistent throughout the whole alphabet for a better aesthetic appeal for for easier writing.
Direction: Which way is this language written? From left to right? Right to left? Top to bottom?
Translation: If this language is separate from a spoken language, can it be pronounced? Or only translated to read in another language?
Accents: If you’re writing with the Latin alphabet, use accents sparingly. Make sure you know how they affect pronunciation before using them and don’t drench your language with them.
Forms: How many forms of writing are there? Is there a lowercase and an uppercase?
Sign Language:

Gestures: Think of what gestures may exist in your culture. Are there any friendly gestures? Any offensive ones? How often are they used?
Full Language: Is there a fully developed sign language? Was it created for those who are hearing impaired or for another reason? When writing this, don’t describe all the signs made unless what is being said might be important or meaningful to the story. Keep the description short.


Other:
Name the Language: Calling the language the “common tongue” is overdone, boring, and just plain lazy writing. Give the language a name.
Borrow: If you want, you can borrow root words from another language to base yours off of. You can also borrow grammar rules from other languages if you wish. Borrowing can often make this process easier for you and it may help readers familiar with the base language see the similarities in your new language.
History: What is the history of the language? Was it once dead and then brought back? Are there any negative connotations with certain words? What are the histories behind these words?
Create Your Own Language
How to Create a Language in One Day
Language Construction Kit
Using Invented Languages in Your Novel

    thewritingcafe:

    For all you writers out there who want to create a language for your story.

    When creating a new language, it’s important to think of these four things:

    1. Is it a spoken language?
    2. Is it a written language?
    3. Is it a sign language?
    4. Is it a combination of the above?

    Once you’ve decided how your language exists, you can move on to the next steps:

    1. What culture does it belong to? Try reflecting the culture within the language. The Dothraki in A Song of Ice and Fire center their language around horses as spoken of in this article. Think of the sound and what emotions it could be compared to.
    2. How old is it? Decide how old your language is and its history. Language changes over time and borrows from other languages as it grows.
    3. Is it a dead language? A dead language is a language that is no longer used in ever day life. If there is a dead language (like Latin) in your culture, what records exist of it? Several cultures use the Latin name for species all over the world and English speakers use Latin phrases all the time. Does anyone study this language? Does anyone know how to pronounce it? Are there any missing pieces?
    4. Who uses it? Decide who uses this language. If it is spoken and there is more than one language used in the area, is there only a certain group of people who speak this language? If it is written, what is the literacy rate?

    Once you’ve established the above, you’ll have down the basics of your language. Now we’ll move on to specific types of language:

    Spoken Language:

    • Alphabet: Again, really think of how you want it to sound. Create a phonetic alphabet for the spoken language and build the vocabulary off that. 
    • Vocab: If the language is used sparingly in your story, start with the phrases you use first. Create words for these. See how they sound together. Keep track of these words and their various forms (past, present, plural, singular, etc.).
    • Grammar: Play with the sentence structure. In Latin, a verb is often at the end of the sentence. In Spanish, the adjective comes after the noun most of the time. Keep these structures consistent and don’t make it too confusing if you have trouble with this.
    • Translate: Translate everything you have into the language you write in, even if you don’t use it. Write as much detail as you can about your languages to make it as authentic as possible.
    • Style: What would be considered the “formal” style? If there is a written language, is the formal style used more often in writing than in speaking?
    • Accents: Does the pronunciation of words differ from place to place? It most likely will if the language is widespread. Accents are influenced by other cultures and languages. The accents of the southwestern US came from English accents while other southern accents came from the influence of France and Jamaica.
    • Stress: Know what syllables to stress. This will affect the pronunciation and overall sound of your language. 
    Written Language:
    • Alphabet: Create the written alphabet. There are a few ways you can do this. One is making new letters for each letter you have in the alphabet you write in and another is creating letters that stand for phonetic sounds. The shapes of the letters should be consistent throughout the whole alphabet for a better aesthetic appeal for for easier writing.
    • Direction: Which way is this language written? From left to right? Right to left? Top to bottom?
    • Translation: If this language is separate from a spoken language, can it be pronounced? Or only translated to read in another language?
    • Accents: If you’re writing with the Latin alphabet, use accents sparingly. Make sure you know how they affect pronunciation before using them and don’t drench your language with them.
    • Forms: How many forms of writing are there? Is there a lowercase and an uppercase?
    Sign Language:
    • Gestures: Think of what gestures may exist in your culture. Are there any friendly gestures? Any offensive ones? How often are they used?
    • Full Language: Is there a fully developed sign language? Was it created for those who are hearing impaired or for another reason? When writing this, don’t describe all the signs made unless what is being said might be important or meaningful to the story. Keep the description short.

    Other:

    • Name the Language: Calling the language the “common tongue” is overdone, boring, and just plain lazy writing. Give the language a name.
    • Borrow: If you want, you can borrow root words from another language to base yours off of. You can also borrow grammar rules from other languages if you wish. Borrowing can often make this process easier for you and it may help readers familiar with the base language see the similarities in your new language.
    • History: What is the history of the language? Was it once dead and then brought back? Are there any negative connotations with certain words? What are the histories behind these words?

    Create Your Own Language

    How to Create a Language in One Day

    Language Construction Kit

    Using Invented Languages in Your Novel